Name: Per Frykman
Headquarters:
Stockholm, Sweden
Website:
perfrykman.com
Superpower:
Enhancing your reputation

 

Per Frykman is a Reputation Advisor who can analyze and strengthen your professional reputation as an individual. He and his colleagues are spread all over Scandinavia and in London. I talk to him about why and how he works from anywhere.


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Watch the full interview

Please note: there are some sound issues in the video version which was fixed in the podcast (Per’s volume is softer than mine), but it’s still a fabulous conversation!

 

Powerful quotes by Per Frykman

Reputation is the cornerstone of the collaboration economy. It is your most valuable asset and the highest valuable possession that you have. At the same time, it is your most unknown possession.

 

What appeals to me about remote working is the freedom and the feeling of being close to my clients wherever I am.

 

Working remotely or collaborating with people in different countries depends on three key factors: my reputation, what they can expect from me, and the trust that I’m building. Trust is knowing your reputation and living up to those expectations.

 

We are hired by our clients, by our employers, based on our strengths. But no one is actually aware of what their strengths look like. We are experts on our weaknesses for some strange reason.

 

I have a very good tool that I’ve been working with for 10 years, and that’s my stop-doing list. There is a myth that says that winners never quit. I say winners quit all the time, but they quit the right things at the right time. I have a lot of weak spots. But then I decide to put them on my stop-doing list and try to get rid of them over time. And that way, I pushed into the sector where my talents, my ambition, and my passion just joined forces to create great stuff.

 

Decide to do something and then respect for the time that it takes. It could take half a year. It could take a year. But once you make the decision, something interesting happens. We are so focused on our history, what we did two or three or four years ago. And actually, no one cares. What makes a client or employer choose you? It’s always the potential for the future, not your experience three, four or five years ago.

 

I spent four days working from cafes in Barcelona having breakfast, lunch, and dinner in different restaurants on the same square. I went down to the sea in the evenings and enjoyed life. But working in that way, with many people, listening to people, talking to people, and writing, I think it’s perfect because I get so many new ideas that way.

 

Sometimes it sounds like I’m working all the time, but actually I’m not because my work and life are integrated. I don’t know when I’m working and when I’m not working. And that’s perfect for me because I can choose just to close down my work for two or three days, or I can work intensively for many days because I just love what I’m doing.

 

Courage is something that I think is extremely important because when you are always exploring new ways, you shouldn’t listen too much what people are saying about you. When I tell people I’m going to do something and they say it won’t work, I know I’m on the right track.

 

When you start to feel  stagnation in your job, you’ve been there for too long. If you don’t enjoy it, then it’s time to quit.

 

Your creativity goes away sitting in an office. You have to get out of the office to meet other people because otherwise, you’ll be talking to the same people over and over again and finally, we start whining with those people instead of being creative.

 

Many career coaches tell you that you first have to decide what you want to do and then go after it, and then act. I’ve actually never seen that work because I think you have to do it the other way around: act first and then you will discover what you want.

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